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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
During my test ride I was stunned by how much I loved the enviolo automatiq transmission on the Speed. But the fact that the rear rack has a 10kg limit is making me sad. I don’t want to haul huge loads and tour… but 15-20 kg of groceries in panniers would be nice… and reasonable for a $5K bike. Does Serial 1 have plans for further rack options? Or should I assume I can find a smart bike shop to help me retrofit an after market rack? The super sleek philosophy of Serial1 leaves few options to attach. And, I assume the transmission hub and disc brakes will make it even harder to attached a rack.

Thoughts? Anyone.

That having been said… dang this bike is sweet!!

~Victor
 

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The front rack also has a 10kg limit so together that’s 20 kg or 44 lbs. I don’t know how much panniers weigh themselves so say they are 10 lbs (seems high) that’d leave 34lbs of food you could load up on for a trip home from the grocery store I’d be pleased with that kind of haul.
There’s also that total rider and bike weight thing of 280lbs to deal with also. The bikes weighs 59lbs that leaves 221lbs less 44lbs on rack‘s leaves 177lbs for rider weight. That wouldn’t work for me since I’m 220lbs and ride a step-thru which weighs 59.5lbs. I’m already maxed out and haven’t loaded a thing but do regularly ride over that 280lb limit what with cloths, hip pack, water, bear spray and tools like a pump/spare tube because if anyone flats I’d be me.
You could probably tow a trailer for a grocery run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes I understand your point. The big problem with the front rack is that it’s connected to the wheel which is not an ideal way to carry heavy items. I’ve seen some bikes where the front rack is connected to the steering tube area keeping it from flopping back-and-forth. Today I actually weighed a moderately loaded bag of groceries… it weighed about 12 lbs. so two bags would slightly exceed the weight limit of that rack. Probably not a big problem. I also have a hard time believing they don’t provide a place to attach a water bottle rack. I know they make some holders that don’t require screws. But really? Anyway I loved the bike when I rode it … and I will give it one more test ride before I make my Black Friday Week sale decision.
 

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I get the weight on the front wheel thing definitely not ideal. I’m sure that future models will get some improvements like you mentioned. We still love our step-thrus. I have well over a 1000 miles on mine and no problems and the best thing is not having to oil a chain or adjust a derailleur. Just hop on and ride.
Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yes and i was so surprised i like the automatiq (being a road bike cyclist). but i totally GOT the cadence based shifting. kind of eerie feeling the gearing ‘well up’ as I pressed harder on pedals. so interesting. i’ll be taking my 2nd test ride tomorrow to see if I still feel that way.
 

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Yeah I totally forgot about the shifting thing too its great to not even think about shifting and that’s what these bikes are about set it and forget it. I can’t see you feeling any different, you should have a huge smile on while riding I know I do.
 

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I'm in the same boat as @victrolux. I loved test riding the Rush/Cty. However, I'd like to install a child seat in the back (looking at 40lbs with child) . The folks at the showroom didn't know much about this. It's going to be absolute joy for any kid to ride on the back of this bike. If anyone here has an answer to this question, that will be great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
UPDATE: My 2nd test ride of the Rush/City Speed today. Came down from the clouds a bit. Became a bit less pleased with the automatic shifting. This came after I tested another bike with an Enviolo CVT transmission (Gazelle C380+). In this case it was a non-automatiq version. A twist grip manual control. Not as slick as the Serial1 automatiq, but it offered infinite subtlety of shifting but via the twist grip. It required some easing off of pedal pressure (but not much) when shifting up to a harder gear . It offered the same style of mid drive/carbon belt/CVT powertrain... just a different way of shifting. When I factored in the other bike's more standard and capable attributes (3 times the load limit on rear rack, actual braze-ons form a water bottle, stem length options, etc), from a 100 year old company, I have begun to lean towards the Gazelle bike.

I'm not here to be negative about the super cool Serial 1 bikes... and I have still not decided. But I just figure my story might help similarly conflicted potential Serial1 purchasers during this pressurized Black Friday Sale week.

Just for fun I have attached a few shots of the Serial 1 Speed and even a couple of the Gazelle.
Bicycle Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Wheel Bicycle wheel rim Crankset
Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Bicycle wheel rim

Bicycle Land vehicle Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Tire Bicycle frame

Bicycle Wheel Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Land vehicle Bicycle wheel

Bicycle Tire Bicycle wheel rim Crankset Wheel


Bicycle Tire Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Land vehicle Bicycle wheel


and the other bike I test rode (Gazelle 380+)
Bicycle Wheel Plant Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Tire


Bicycle Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Bicycles--Equipment and supplies



Tire Wheel Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Bicycle Bicycle wheel
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Yeah I totally forgot about the shifting thing too its great to not even think about shifting and that’s what these bikes are about set it and forget it. I can’t see you feeling any different, you should have a huge smile on while riding I know I do.
I really enjoyed my 2nd test ride of the Speed. Took it (and other brands) up a 20%+ grade. It managed that hill a touch better than others. I'm not planning many 20% grades in my riding... but it served as a test. It was sort of interesting... because if I pedalled too hard on the hill (I was panicking as the grade got severe) the auto shifter tended to shift up to a harder gear. Odd. So, on the hill, I learned to slow my feet a touch so the tranny would lower the gear to keep my cadence correct. So, ironically, I had to slow my cadence just a touch to maintain a high enough cadence on the super steep grade.

I also noticed that the Automatiq shifted in what felt like (and sounded like if you listened closely in a quite area) distinct steps. So, even tho the hub's ratios are infinitely variable, the Automatiq actually changed the gear ratio in a number of discreet steps. From what I am guessing (and based on looking at the Enviolo app) 9 steps. So you get nice 9-"gear" automatic shifting. It's all you need, but, for the record, there are not an infinite number of increments. Which leads me to. . . . . . .

I was comparing the Speed to a Gazelle c380+ (which has the same Envilo hub but without Automatiq... you use a twist grip to manually adjust the same infinitely variable gearbox). That bike was a touch less powerful on the 20% grade... I had to work harder to not bog down (and I am not yet comfortable standing on the pedals of a "dutch" style bike without clip-in pedals). But it wasn't way less powerful. It was fine. But I could shift as much or as little as I wanted... manually using the twist grip. Now, one downside of the manually shifted Enviolo is when shifting to a harder gear, it is best to back off the pedalling either totally or at least a touch... for a short moment. Not unlike a manual shift car, where you let off the gas, push down the cluth pedal, shift the gear, let up the clutch and press on the gas. It sounds like a lot to do, but shifting quickly in a car, that whole porcess takes like 1/2 sec. On the Gazelle it is similar (or, actually, slightly better since letting off the force on the pedals just a touch is usually enough to allow the shift... you don't really have to totally stop pedaling). AND what's key is, you only have to do that when shifting to a harder gear. So, on a steep grade you can manually twist the shift grip to a lower (easier) gear while still applying pedal force. Also on the manual shift Enviolo, you can anticipate gearing needs... shifting up or down before to get to a downhill or up hill... or any circumstance that would be better to be prepared for. The Automatiq doesn't (yet!) have the ability to look ahead and think, in selecting your gearing.

Sooooo... all that having been said... I started to see how the Automatiq may not be the tranny I want to live with for years. So I will be respectfully (and, really, sadly) stepping back from the Black Friday Sale brink. I will not be pulling the trigger on the very cool Serial City/Rush Speed in white. Dang! But I will continue to read this forum to watch the progress of what I'm sure will be a full suite of bikes and products from Serial 1 over the years!
 

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K.I.S.S. A acronym we used in the service. A electric motor such as the Brose is powerful enough to give you heavy pedal power without the lactic acid burn. A well thought out and made E-Bike (Serial One) only, needs one gear,the brushless drive gives you the extra you need.The pully on my O. G. softail motorcycle has a single pully in the rear not shifting there. I see a new drive on the horizon that combines the cvt and motor in one housing like a front wheel drive automobile or a motorcycle 😉😉😉
 
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